Citrine

Citrine is the transparent, pale yellow to brownish orange variety of quartz.

BRIEF INTRO

Citrine is rare in nature. In the days before modern gemology, its tawny color caused it to be confused with topaz. Today, its attractive color, plus the durability and affordability it shares with most other quartzes, makes it the top-selling yellow-to-orange gem. In the contemporary market, citrine’s most popular shade is an earthy, deep, brownish or reddish orange.

IRON

A trace of iron in citrine’s structure is responsible for its yellow-to-orange color.

HEAT

Natural citrine is rare. Most citrine on the market is the result of heat treatment of amethyst.

POPULAR

Citrine is recognized as one of the most popular and frequently purchased yellow gemstones.

TREATMENTS

There are processes used to alter the color, apparent clarity, or improve the durability of gems. Some gemstones have synthetic counterparts that have essentially the same chemical, physical, and optical properties, but are grown by man in a laboratory.

NOVEMBER

Along with topaz, citrine is a birthstone for November. It’s also recognized as the gem that commemorates the thirteenth anniversary.

Citrine’s color comes from traces of iron. It’s perhaps the most popular and frequently purchased yellow gemstone and an attractive alternative for topaz as well as for yellow sapphire.