Ametrine

This transparent quartz has colors of both amethyst and citrine, and is called ametrine or amethyst-citrine.

BRIEF INTRO

Whether projecting from pegmatite walls or encrusting cavities in volcanic rock, quartz abounds worldwide. People have used quartz in jewelry for thousands of years. When quartz displays the colors of amethyst and citrine in a single gem, the material is called ametrine or amethyst-citrine. Ametrine’s only commercial source is the Anahi mine in Bolivia.

NO PLACE ELSE

There is only one commercial source for ametrine: the Anahi mine in Bolivia.

NATURE’S GIFT

The presence of amethyst and citrine colors in a quartz crystal is a rare gift of nature.

CUTTER’S CHOICE

Ametrine’s colors blend, combine, and contrast uniquely in each gem.

TREATMENTS

There are processes used to alter the color, apparent clarity, or improve the durability of gems. Some gemstones have synthetic counterparts that have essentially the same chemical, physical, and optical properties, but are grown by man in a laboratory.

SIGN

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